taha

Books

Afrikology and Transdisciplinarity: A Restorative Epistemology

This monograph is intended to examine the epistemology of restorative rights in view of the continuing violation of rights in all aspects of life on the African continent and other parts of the world. It is based on the research, which the Marcus Garvey Pan-Afrikan Institute undertook between 2006–2008, under a cross-disciplinary research project entitled Restorative Justice and its Relationship to International Humanitarian Law, which resulted in a Comprehensive Report that was later discussed at an international conference in Nairobi in August 2008. This conference was opened by the Prime Minister of Kenya, Right Hon. Raila Odinga and attended by Ministers of Justice and Constitutional Affairs, judges and other ministers from the five countries in which the research was carried out, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Southern Sudan. The objective here is to relate the concept of restorative justice, in its broad and cross-disciplinary meaning to the epistemology of Afrikology and transdisciplinarity, which aim at breaking down disciplinary boundaries between the different academic disciplines, which inhibit our capabilities of looking at realities in a comprehensive, holistic manner; leading to the adoption of fragmented solutions to problems, which inevitably fail to address those problems. As stated in the monograph on the epistemology of Afrikology, knowledge is created holistically by the heart and the basis of the perceptions and experiences of the five senses. The knowledge created through the word, which ultimately constitutes the language and the community, is related to our cosmic forces and reason, which gives cosmic significance to our existence. We cannot therefore detach ourselves from these cosmic forces and reality must be examined from this combinatory holistic understanding.

Afrikology and Transdisciplinarity: A Restorative Epistemology
Edited by Dani W. Nabudere, 2012
157mm x 238mm
206 Pages
ISBN: 978-0-7983-0302-6

Price: ZAR160.00

South African Foreign Policy Review Volume 1

The richness of public and academic discourses on the past, present and future direction of South Africa’s role in Africa and the world suggests that as a sub-discipline of politics South African foreign policy is ready for a systematic and regular appraisal in the form of a series of publications that the Institute for Global Dialogue will call South African Foreign Policy Review. This is also because constant changes in international and domestic circumstances impinge on the management and analysis of South Africa’s foreign policy.

This, the first review provides an important opportunity to build on existing foreign policy works in order to take stock of the road already travelled in the past decade or so. This is crucial in laying some basis for anticipating the country’s future role, and considering the opportunities and challenges, which future volumes of the review will consider. This volume provides a wide-ranging appraisal of the relationship between stated foreign policy goals and actual outputs and outcomes, an assessment of how foreign policy has actually been operationalized and implemented.

To this end, common themes in South African foreign policy provide the framework for the first review. These include foreign policy decision-making; soft power dynamics in the foreign policy’s strategic calculus; diplomatic tools used – economic diplomacy, peace diplomacy and paradiplomacy-; South Africa’s relations with key states in Africa, in the global south and in the global north; South Africa’s approach to Africa multilateral, global multilateralism/governance. The review hopes to stimulate further discussion and thinking on the challenges confronted, and the future shape and direction of South Africa’s foreign policy.

Editors: Chris Landsberg and Jo-Ansie van Wyk
ISBN: 978-0-7983-0312-5

Price: ZAR250.00

Peace and Security for African Development: Proceedings of the sixth annual AYGS Conference held in Boksburg, South Africa on 23-26 March 2011

The AISA Young Graduates and Scholars (AYGS) initiative is a research capacity building programme. The programme was conceived in 2005 with the aim of building a body of knowledge on, and to project the African voice in, various discourses about the continent and the African diaspora. It is further intended to bridge the existing gap of expertise in knowledge production on African affairs by developing a cadre of knowledge producers among the youth. The objective of the AYGS has always been to provide a platform for young and emerging scholars on new insights in the debates pertaining to the challenges facing African societies. It also intends to forge a new way for the upliftment of African value systems and the ultimate integration of the African continent. AISA has partnered with several organisations, such as the Guggenheim Foundation, New York, which brings graduate students or fellows from their programmes to exchange ideas and compete with AISA’s chosen young scholars. The Council of Europe is another organisation that used to sponsor AISA Young Scholars to European Union activities, and co-sponsor AISA activities.

ISBN: 978-0-7983-0312-5
Size: 168 X 240mm

Price: ZAR370.00

Africa Yearbook: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2011

In May 2003, the Africa-Europe Group of Interdisciplinary Studies (AEGIS) encouraged some of its member institutions to publish an Africa Yearbook with a wider international appeal. The African Studies Centre in Leiden (ASC), the Institute of African Affairs in Hamburg (IAA) and the Nordic Africa Institute in Uppsala (NAI) – all very active AEGIS centres sharing similar profiles – accepted this challenge and their joint efforts first bore fruit in the initial volume of the series in 2004. In 2007, the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation in Uppsala (DHF) joined this international project, while the NAI ended its involvement with the fifth volume published in 2009. For this current volume Rolf Hofmeier once again joined us as sub-editor for the Eastern Africa section.
The country-specific articles cover domestic politics, foreign affairs and socioeconomic developments in the states of sub-Saharan Africa during the calendar year under review. This year, the newly independent sovereign state of South Sudan is included the first time. While we recognise the impossibility of finding fully objective indicators for the relative importance of each of the states covered by the Yearbook, the length of the country-specific articles aims to reflect the approximate weight of each country. The four sub-regions are also introduced by means of an overview article. Further overviews summarise general continental developments, European-African relations and the United Nations and Africa.
The Yearbook is based on scholarly work, but is oriented towards a wider target readership, including students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the sphere of development cooperation and business people. Without forcing the individual contributions too much into a straitjacket, the volume is primarily concerned with providing factual (though not necessarily neutral) information. Each issue, in focusing almost exclusively on developments during the particular calendar year, provides a completely fresh annual overview of events and thereby adds to the cumulative record of ongoing developments.
We wish to express our gratitude to all the contributors for their collaboration in this endeavour; to the partner institutions in AEGIS for encouraging us to embark on this ambitious project; to Carol Rowe for her meticulous language editing; to Bas van der Mije for his unfailing coordinating assistance; and to Brill Publishers for their continued commitment. Last but not least, we note with appreciation and gratitude the ongoing support of our three institutions and their remaining loyal to turning the original idea into reality.

Co-Published by AISA, GIGA, Dag Hammarskjold Foundation, Brill and Afrika Studie Centrum

Editors: Andreas Mehler, Henning Melber and Klaas van Walraven
ISBN: 978-90-04-23398-0
Size: 250 x 170mm

Price: ZAR250.00

Regional Trade Integration Economy Growth and Poverty Reduction

Despite a long history of regional integration and a multiplicity of regional organizations in southern Africa, the effect of regional integration on economic growth and poverty reduction remains debatable or elusive. This causes many to doubt whether regional integration is in actual fact an effective poverty reduction strategy. Accordingly, the focus of this book is to explore and analyse whether specific Southern African Development Community (SADC) trade integration policies, especially the trade liberalisation regime, have produced economic growth and reduced poverty in the region.

While it is generally agreed that economic growth is the panacea to poverty reduction, there is little evidence as to whether regional integration in Africa is associated with economic growth in the countries concerned and subsequently leads to poverty reduction. The book makes recommendations on how the SADC FTAs can contribute to poverty reduction and socioeconomic development, and goes on to suggest policy proposals on how to enhance the contribution of the FTAs to poverty eradication and economic development. It also identifies specific activities to be undertaken to enable supply-side and productive competitiveness interventions to support the FTAs and contribute to economic development.  The potential constraints and negative impacts of the FTAs are investigated and highlighted, and possible solutions are recommended and motivated.

Edited by Moses Tekere
ISBN: 978-0-7983-0304-0

Price: ZAR300.00

The Africana World: From Fragmentation to Unity and Renaissance

It is 127 years since the Scramble for Africa divided up the continent, imposing borders that have led to conflict rather than peace and stability. It is 100 years since the African National Congress (ANC) was founded as the first African liberation movement with pan-African roots. It is nearly 50 years since the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) was founded in May 1963 and ten years since the African Union (AU) was born with a vision that seeks ‘the actualisation of human dignity, development and prosperity for the entire African people … anchored on a vision of an integrated, prosperous and peaceful Africa … driven and managed by its own citizens … and representing a dynamic force in the international arena’. The achievement of the AU vision is predicated on colonialism being dead. However, it has actually been replaced by neo-colonialism, which requires extra vigilance from Africa and its diaspora in order for the unity and renaissance dreamed of to become a reality.

The chapters in Africana World: From Fragmentation to Unity and Renaissance address colonial and postcolonial African realities with a view to present a holistic and transcontinental appraisal of questions, issues and challenges that confront the continent. Contributors are drawn from different parts of the world – Africa, Europe and the Americas –and it is this eclectic range of scholarly views that lends a rich historicity to the meaning of Africanity. The book contains multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary engagements with Africa’s rich cultural heritage, its lingering contemporary challenges, its multifaceted systems of knowledge and its future in the exciting context of the twenty-first century. Africana World: From Fragmentation to Unity and Renaissance is put together in order to help develop the study and knowledge of African liberation across the continent and the diaspora. This first volume launches a new book series, following the Scramble for Africa conferences held every May to commemorate the founding of the OAU, which will be published annually to support the scholarly study of African unity and renaissance in order to replace the lingering imagery of colonialism in Africa with a fully liberated African consciousness.

Editors: Mammo Muchie, Sanya Osha and Matlotleng Matlou
ISBN: 9780798303118

Price: ZAR250.00

Creating Systems of Innovation in Africa: Country Case Studies

The most popularised concept in the economics of innovation literature has been the national system of innovation (NSI). It was in the late 1980s that the concept that Frederik List coined as the ‘National Political Economy of Production’ took off again with different thinkers writing about the peculiarities and distinctions of the Japanese, American, British, German, East Asian Tigers and other varieties of system construction.

Freeman defines National System of Innovation as ‘the network of institutions in the public and private sectors whose activities and interactions initiate, import, modify and diff use new technologies.’ Richard Nelson defines it as ‘a set of institutions whose interactions determine the innovative performance of national firms. Lundvall defines the system of innovation as the ‘elements and relationships which interact in the production, diffusion and use of new and economically useful knowledge and are either located within or rooted inside the borders of a nation state.’

The normative assumption is that those nations that succeeded in building economic strength relied on the science, engineering, technology and innovation capability that made them to achieve an innovation advantage to put them ahead in the world, acquiring national or regional economic leadership as the case may be depending on what level of analyses is selected to look at particular failure, success or progress they made.

Editors: Mammo Muchie and Angathevar Baskaran
ISBN: 978-0-7983-0347-7

Price: ZAR150.00

Innovation for Sustainability: African and European Perspectives

The innovation system theory has to deal with climate change as it generates the intellectual tools to promote development. A unified innovation system theory that integrates the eradication of threats to nature with the promotion of development is critically important to advance an original pedigree and trajectory of epistemology. Africa must learn and appreciate the costs to itself from the way Europe industrialised. It can neither follow nor imitate the European pattern of industrialisation. It has to include in its own development agenda both the meeting of social needs and choosing a path of development that would not bring ecological harm in the process. The African innovation system has to evolve in a nature protecting – rather than hurting – system; in addition, social needs must be met rather than exacerbating the social inequalities path of development.

Editors: Mammo Muchie and Angathevar Baskaran
ISBN: 978-0-7983-0346-0

Price: ZAR150.00

Building Innovation Research in Africa: Case Studies

African countries, taken separately, or grouped together as a unit, still largely remain resource-based economies. The challenge is to change the resource-based economic structure into a science, technology, engineering and innovation driven knowledge based economic system. Taking this challenge head on means African countries have to organise their science, technology, engineering and innovation for a development agenda systematically, more in collaboration than in competition with one another. What appears to remain a defi cit is the vast collaborative distance that still exists on matters of critical importance to the economic transformation of Africa.

Editors: Mammo Muchie and Angathevar Baskaran
ISBN: 978-0-7983-0341-1

Price: ZAR0.00

Challenges of African Transformation: Exploring Through Innovation Approach

A brief overview of the African economic picture reveals a paradox where the continent that has rich mineral resources, nearly a billion people and a land mass which includes the sizes of China, USA, India, Western Europe, Argentina together larger than the sum of these regions is in an unacceptable state of being an object of aid, debt and loans despite the vast resources both known and yet to be explored. Africa should have been a productive and innovation centre and not a charity and aid centre of the world where ‘donorship’ has replaced African national ownership’ of not just Africa’s resources, but even worse, Africa’s own agency, autonomy and independence to shape policy and direction; to undertake African integrated national development by establishing a science, engineering and technology based knowledge, innovative, learning and competent economy.

Editors: Mammo Muchie and Angathevar Baskaran
ISBN: 978-0-7983-0348-4

Price: ZAR150.00

NATO and the catastrophic failure in Libya: Lessons for Africa in the forging of African Unity

When the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings erupted in Africa, in the first two months of the year 2011, with the chant, ‘the people want to bring down the regime’, there was hope all over the continent that these rebellions were part of a wider African Awakening. President Ben Ali of Tunisia was forced to step down and fled to Saudi Arabia. Within a month of Ben Ali’s departure, Hosni Mubarak of Egypt was removed from power by the people, who mobilized a massive revolutionary movement in the country. Four days after the ousting of Mubarak, sections of the Libyan people rebelled in Benghazi. Within days, this uprising was militarised, with armed resistance countered by declarations from the Libyan leadership vowing to use raw state power to root out the rebellion.

The first Libyan demonstrations occurred on February 15, 2011, but by February 21 there were reports that innocent civilians were in imminent danger of being massacred by the army. This information was embellished by reports of the political leadership branding the rebellious forces as ‘rats’. The United States (US), Britain and France took the lead to rush through a resolution in the United Nations (UN) Security Council, invoking the principle of the ‘responsibility to protect’. This concept of responsibility to protect had been embraced and supported by many governments in the aftermath of the genocidal episodes in Rwanda, Bosnia and Kosovo. The UN Security Council Resolution 1973 of 2011 was loosely worded, with the formulation ‘all necessary measures’ tacked on to ensure wide latitude for those societies and political leaders who orchestrated the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) intervention in Libya.

In the following nine months, the implementation of this UN resolution exposed the real objectives of the leaders of the US, France and Britain. With the Western media fuelling a propaganda campaign in the traditions of ‘manufacturing consent’, this Security Council authorisation was stretched from a clear and limited civilian protection mandate into a military campaign for regime change and the execution of the President of Libya, Muammar Gaddafi.

Author: Horace Campbell
ISBN: 978-0-7983-0343-9

Price: ZAR250.00

Forum on China-Africa Cooperation: The Politics of Human Resource Development

Since the establishment of the Forum on ChinaAfrica Cooperation (FOCAC), China and Africa have had substantial dialogues about furthering various aspects of human resource development and cooperation between the two sides. The Chinese government has firmly kept its promises to provide the human resource assistance to African countries within the stipulated time. This book assesses specific measures raised under FOCAC which include training and exchange, human resource development, medical cooperation and knowledge production. It further examines the impact of the FOCAC initiatives on human resources capacity. From an African continental side, options are being provided to develop human resource capital on the continent. The significance of China’s so- power is determined as to whether the educational initiatives are done to impose superpower practices or implemented as a method of not only alleviating poverty but also promoting better understanding of the two regions. Various questions are raised as to what is the impact of China’s so- power blueprint through its education, academic exchanges, training and skills development and medical cooperation on the African continent’s future? Furthermore, what does it mean for China to promote human resource capacity and development through cultural or public diplomacy? And what does it mean for Africa to engage in the human resource development initiatives in a joint fashion? The book eventually demonstrates how the educational measures not only promote sustainable development particularly in Africa, but also illustrate a different angle as to how FOCAC is strengthening relations between the two regions through soft power.

Editors: LI Anshan and Funeka Yazini April

ISBN: 9780798303675

Price: ZAR150.00

Restorative justice in Africa

This book was inspired by the need of post-conflict societies to manage knowledge resources in such a way that it creates lasting restoration of durable peaceful relationships among people. It aims to demonstrate the challenges of the management of knowledge for restorative justice in Africa and the principles and practices by which these challenges can be met. To achieve this aim they applied what they call the ‘Trans-dimensional Knowledge Management Model (TDKM-M)’ to specific cases of restorative justice in South Africa, Rwanda, Uganda, Kenya and Liberia. After an analysis of the case studies, the authors successfully demonstrated the challenges of the management of knowledge for restorative justice in Africa and the principles and practices by which these challenges can be met. The authors revealed common challenges to restorative justice such as establishing the ‘truth’; the institutionalization of recommendations by truth and reconciliation bodies; the handling of non-cooperative offenders; and replacing of ‘good’ values’ with ‘bad’ values as major challenges to restorative justice. To meet these challenges, they propose certain principles of trans-dimensional restorative justice:the establishment of ‘a trans-dimensional knowledge foundation’ (not some version of ‘the truth’); leadership in the implementation of strategies and plans; restoration or establishment of good relations among all people (not only the ruling elites); the identification of tacit and unseen factors that will determine successful restoration of these relationships; and changing these tacit and unseen factors.

Editors: Dani Wadada Nabudere and Andreas Velthuizen

ISBN: 978-0-7983-0358-3

Price: ZAR180.00

Triumph and Prosperity of Education in Africa

The Triumph and Prosperity of Education in Africa examines education in the continent of Africa for the past thirty years, with emphasis on the two decades, when Ministers of Education of the African Union (AU) made various resolutions and goals of what they want achieved at four various levels of the education system, namely early childhood development, primary, secondary and university education. Such resolutions and goals were made in light of Africa’s social, political, economic and national development. The book was put together with an emphasis to examine the extent to which such goals and resolutions were being reached in light of the deadline of the year 2015, set for the world millennium development goals (MGDs). Moreover, special attention was paid to the following important aspects: education language policy as a medium of instruction; human capital flight as reflected in the brain drain in Africa; and indigenous knowledge systems.

Twenty-two African scholars from fifteen African countries of the five regions of the continent examine the state of the education system in different countries. The book exposes the enormous strides that Africa has made at all levels of the education system – early childhood education, primary, secondary and higher education levels. It is recommended that all Africans and people from other countries read this book in order to appreciate the strides Africa has made in transforming the education system and advancing its people.

Editors: Tuntufye Mwamwenda and Phindile Lukhele-Olorunju

ISBN: 978-0-7983-0371-2

Price: ZAR275.00

Nationalism and the National Projects in Southern Africa: New Critical Reflections

Editors: Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Fenix Ndhlovu

ISBN: 978-0-7983-0395-8

Size: 240mm x 170mm

Extent: 376 Pages

Availability: August 2013

Published: AISA

Despite the fact that nationalism and its national projects have in recent years been severely criticised by postcolonial theorists for being essentialist, fundamentalist and archaic; by feminists for being patriarchal and exclusive; by global financial institutions for being antagonistic to development and globalisation; by pan-Africanists for being anti-continental unity; and by those Africans born after decolonization for being irrelevant; Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Finex Ndhlovu’s book convincingly argue that nationalism has defied its death and displayed remarkable resilience and resonance. Since the end of the Cold War, what has been poignant has been the enduring contest, tensions and contradictions between the growth of various forms of transnationalism on the one hand and a resurgence of territorial as well as other narrow and xenophobic forms of nationalism on the other. In this important book, Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Ndhlovu provides new critical reflections on nationalism and its national projects in Southern Africa covering South Africa, Zimbabwe and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, a member of SADC). The national question is interrogated from different disciplinary vantage points to reveal how it impinges on contemporary challenges of nation-building, development, devolution of power, language questions, and citizenship on the one hand and ethnicity, nativism and xenophobia on the other.

Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgements

Notes on Contributors

Chapter 1

Introduction: New Reflections on Nationalism, National Projects and Pan-Africanism in the Twenty-First Century

Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Finex Ndhlovu

PART ONE: New Meanings of the African National Project

Chapter 2

The New Meaning of the National Project in the Twenty-first Century

Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo

Chapter 3

Is Nativism a National Question in Post-colonial Africa?

Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni

Chapter 4

Fanon on the Pitfalls of the African National Project

Tendayi Sithole

Chapter 5

African Nationalism in the age of Coloniality:Triumphs, Tragedies and Futures

William Jethro Mpofu

PART TWO: Nationalism, Language and Freedom

Chapter 6

The African National Language Question and the African National Project

Finex Ndhlovu

Chapter 7

The Devolution of Power Debate and the Zimbabwe National Project

Philani Moyo

Chapter 8

Zimbabwe’s Cultural Revolution and the ‘Melodic Press Release’: Mediated

National Imaginaries in an Age of Neo-liberalism

Wendy Willems

Chapter 9

The Meaning of African Freedom and Independence:

The Road from Rhodesia to Zimbabwe

Sibonginkosi Mazibuko

PART THREE: Culture, Development and Gender

Chapter 10

Contending Versions of Post-apartheid South African Nationhood: Insights from Cultural Villages

Morgan Ndlovu

Chapter 11

Development Discourse and the National Project in Post-Apartheid South Africa

Sebeka Richard Plaatjie

Chapter 12

Gendering the African National Project in the Twenty-First Century

Vongai Z. Nyawo-Shava and Hazel Tafadzwa Ngoshi

PART FOUR: National Question, Ethnicity and Citizenship

Chapter 13

Becoming Zimbabwean: Nation and State-Building in the Context of Southern Africa

Alois S. Mlambo

Chapter 14

Land Reform as a National Question in Southern Africa: The Case Study of South Africa

Monene Mogashoa

Chapter 15

Post-coloniality and the Matebeleland Question in Zimbabwe

Brilliant Mhlanga

Chapter 16

The State and Contested Citizenship in Zimbabwe, 1980 -2011

Musiwaro Ndakaripa

Chapter 17

Rethinking the Complexity of Identity Politics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Sentime Kasay

PART FIVE: Conclusion

Chapter 18

Conclusion: The Enduring Legacy of Nationalism and Relevance of National Project in the Twenty-First Century

Finex Ndhlovu and Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni

To Order Contact

Africa Institute of South Africa

P.0. Box 630

Pretoria

0001

Tel: +12 304 9700

Fax: +12 323 8153

Email: publish@ai.org.za

Orders worldwide

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PO Box 721

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Price: ZAR200.00

Bondage of Boundaries and Identity Politics in Postcolonial Africa: The ‘Northern Problem’ and Ethno-Futures

Editors: Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Brilliant Mhlanga

ISBN: 978-0-7983-0391-0

Size: 240mm x 160mm

Extent: 396 Pages

Availability: September 2013

Price: R230

Published: AISA

What has confounded African efforts to create cohesive, prosperous and just states in postcolonial Africa? What has been the long-term impact of the Berlin Conference of 1884-5 on African unity and African statehood? Why is postcolonial Africa haunted by various ethno-national conflicts? Is secession and irredentism the solution? Can we talk of ethno-futures for Africa? These are the kinds of fundamental questions that this important book addresses.

Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Brilliant Mhlanga’s book introduces the metaphor of the ‘northern problem’ to dramatise the fact that there is no major African postcolonial state that does not enclose within its borders a disgruntled minority that is complaining of marginalization, domination and suppression. The irony is that in 1963 at the formation of the OAU, postcolonial African leaders embraced the boundaries arbitrarily drawn by European colonialists and institutionalised the principle of inviolability of ‘bondage of boundaries’ thereby contributing to the problem of ethno-national conflicts.

 The successful struggle for independence of the Eritrean people and the secession of South Sudan in 2011 have encouraged other dominated and marginalised groups throughout Africa to view secession as an option. Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Mhlanga successfully assembled competent African scholars to deal exhaustively with various empirical cases of ethno-national conflicts throughout the African continent as well as engaging with such pertinent issues as Pan-Africanism as a panacea to these problems. This important book delves deeper into complex issues of space, languages, conflict, security, nation-building, war on terror, secession, migration, citizenship, militias, liberation, violence and Pan-Africanism.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. Introduction: Borders, Identities, the ‘Northern Problem’ and Ethno-Futures in Postcolonial Africa

PART 1: SPACE, BOUNDARIES AND CONTOURS OF THE ‘NORTHERN PROBLEM’

2. Space Matters: Rethinking Spatiality in Discourses of Colonial and Postcolonial ‘Boundaries’

3. Africa in Search of (In)security: Beyond the Bondage of Boundaries

4. State-Building, Conflict and Global Terror in the Horn of Africa

5. The Burden of ‘National Languages’ and the Bondage of Linguistic Boundaries in Postcolonial Africa

PART 2: AUTOCHTHONS, MINORITIES AND POLITICS OF SECESSION

6. ‘Northern Problem’: Postcolony, Identity and Political (In)stability in Cote d’Ivoire and Togo

7. Ken Saro-Wiwa, the Ogoni Struggle and the Aesthetics of Spectacle

8. The State and the ‘Southern Problem’ in Sudan: ‘Internal Colonialism,’ Federalism, and Secession

9. The Anglophone Problem and the Secession Option in Cameroon

10. Manumission from Black-on-Black Colonialism: Sovereign Statehood for the British Southern Cameroons

PART 3: MIGRATION, CONFLICT, CITIZENSHIP AND VIOLENCE

11. A Quest for Belonging: Migration, Identities and the Politics of Belonging in Africa

12. ‘Discipline and Disengagement’: Cross-Border Migration and the Quest for Identity Among the Ndebele of South-Western Zimbabwe

13. Homo Sacer: Citizenship, Exclusion and Irregular Labour Migration from Matebeleland, Zimbabwe to South Africa

14. Colonialism, Postcolonial Violence and Repression: Reflections on the Northern Question in Uganda

15. Ethnicity, Conflicts and the Rise of Militia Groups in Nigeria

PART 4: TERRITORIAL NATIONALISM, REGIONALISM AND PAN-AFRICANISM

16. The Betrayal of Liberation – On the Limits to Emancipation Under Governments in Southern African Post-Settler Societies

17. Sovereignty, Self-Determination and the Challenges of Nation Building in Contemporaty Africa

18. The ‘Northern Problem’: Is Pan-Africanism or Regionalism the Answer?

19. Pan-Africanism and African Regional Economic Integration

To Order Contact

Africa Institute of South Africa

P.0. Box 630

Pretoria

0001

Tel: +12 304 9700

Fax: +12 323 8153

Email: publish@ai.org.za

Orders worldwide

AFRICAN BOOKS COLLECTIVE

PO Box 721

Oxford OX1 9EN

UK

Tel: +44 (0) 1865 58 9756

Fax: +44 (0) 1865 412 341

US Tel: +1 415 644 5108

www: africanbookscollective.com

Email: orders@africanbookscollective.com

 

Price: ZAR230.00

Laying the BRICS of a New Global Order: From Yekaterinburg 2009 to eThekwini 2013

Editors:         Francis A. Kornegay and Narnia Bohler-Muller

ISBN:              978-0-7983-0403-0

Size:               168mm X 240mm

Extent:           220 pages

Availability: October 2013

The contributions in this compilation on the emergence of a new global order through BRICS serve to illustrate the complexities inherent in the creation of such a coalition – alternatively referred to as a “grouping”, “association” or “forum” – with each country differently situated geo-politically as well as ideologically and culturally, and in some instances even in conflict with one another in matters of regional peace and security. The fact that there are important commonalties of converging interests, amongst others the status of emerging economic powers and the furtherance of South-South cooperation as well as reforming global governance, cannot and should not hide complexities and contradictions.

These are clearly apparent both within and between the BRICS countries. These diversities are also clear from the varied perspectives of the chapter authors in this compilation, which is why we have assembled this collection relatively loosely as a means of expressing our intellectual and analytic convergences and divergences within and across BRICS. Each chapter contributor writes from a different discipline, country and regional perspective, and it is this diversity that enriches the debate and conversation. As such, there remains enormous room for debate on the subject matter of this book and the diverse contributions open up the parameters of the debate even further. The aim is to ensure that scholars, commentators and practitioners continue to engage critically with theory and practice related to global multilateralism, and BRICS in particular.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ACRONYMS

PROLOGUE: How Did We Get Here?

BRICS I: THE TERRAIN

Laying the BRICS of a New Global Order: A Conceptual Scenario

BRICS II: THE SHANGHAI COOPERATION DIMENSION

China

  • Partnership for Collective Emergence: BRICS in China’s International Strategy
  • BRICS: A New Cooperation Model on the Horizon
  • China and the Indo-Pacific in Beijing’s Strategic Calculus

Russia

  • Russia’s Identity Dilemmas: BRICS, the G8 & the Shanghai Cooperation Organization,
  • Russia’s Geopolitical Calculus in the Launching of BRICS
  • Russia in BRICS: Substantial or instrumental partnership,
  • Russia, BRICS and the Global Supply Chain of Resources for Development
  • The Russian Perspective on Global Governance: Normative Challenges
  • Global Demo-Imperial Configurations: What Place for Russia and BRICS?

BRICS III: THE IBSA TRILATERAL DIMENSION

India

  • Theorizing BRICS: Institutionalization and Cooperatives Agendas
  • Impulses: Trends that will shape India’s world,
  • India’s Security Calculus in Balancing Regional and Global Geopolitical Agendas
  • India’s South-South and Emerging Power Dilammas: The IBSA-BRICS equation
  • Putting Life Into the BRICS: India and the Indo-Pacific in New Delhi’s BRICS calculus

Brazil

  • A Brazil perspective on the BRICS
  • Brazil’s Economic Stake in BRICS
  • Brazil in South America. A Manifest Destiny?
  • Brazil, South American Regionalism and Defining the ‘Atlantic Space’
  • Urban governance, social cohesion and sustainable development: The case of Brazil within BRICS

South Africa

  • South Africa’s Pretoria Agenda: The Role of State Sovereignty, Non-Intervention and Human Rights within the Context of Emerging Power Multilateralism
  • Cape to Cairo: South Africa’s search for strategic depth within BRICS
  • South Africa within BRICS: Substance or piggybacking?
  • Is South Africa Just another BRIC on the Wall: Domestic challenges and the African agenda

EPILOGUE: Where Do We Go From Here?

ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

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African Union Ten Years After: Solving African problems with Pan-Africanism and the African Renaissance

Editors: Mammo Muchie, Phindile Lukhele-Olorunju and Oghenerobor Akpor

ISBN: 978-0-7983-0387-3

Size: 240mm X 175mm

Extent: 564 pages

Published: AISA, October 2013

This book deals with The Africa Union Ten Years After: Putting Africa First is Putting Humanity First. This is the second in a series of books to be produced each year by holding annual conferences on the multi-faceted issue of African liberation. The key themes of the book explore ways of strengthening and improving the efficiency of the African Union, unity amongst African countries, building ownership of the African Union by the people and communities and the entrenchment of pan-Africanism as a viable programme of action to unite Africans by appreciating differences.

In addition, the thought of the key figures of pan-Africanism and black emancipation such as Sylvester Williams and Frantz Fanon is re-positioned to even greater contemporary relevance so that thoughts that stimulate Africans to stand up together to go far and never again all into humiliation are enriched.

We trust this book will add interest, identity and fresh thinking on how Africans move forward together by promoting, with high social and trust capital, Pan-Africanism and the African Renaissance to enter a post-colonial era where policies and actions are determined by the united agency of free Africans the world over.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction

Part I: From the OAU to the African Union: State, Nation, Society and Good Governance in Africa
1. Ghaddafi and the African Union: The End of an Era?
2. Know Thy Self; African Union and the Need for African-Centred Education
3. African Union and the Democratic Project: Examining the Challenges for Task Accomplishment
4. The Impact of Model ‘C’ Schooling on Africanisation of Potential African Intellectuals
5. Elite Corruption and the Impact on African Economic Growth and Human Wellbeing
6. Corruption and Poverty in Africa: Interrogating the Problematic of Reform without Development in Nigeria

Part II: Peace and Security Architecture and its Impact on Africa
7. Panel of the Wise and the Future of Conflict Resolution in Africa
8. Mashopeng Go a Boelwa: Revisiting Our Past as Imperative to Humanising Law Enforcement in South Africa
9. African Solutions to African Problems: The Fault line in Conflict Resolution in Africa.
10. A Return of Hostilities? The Comprehensive Peace Agreement and the Future of a Two-State Sudan

Part III: Science, Technology and Innovation for Pan-Africanism and the African Renaissance
11. Africa and the Impending Nano-divide: An Overview on Temporal and Normative Perspectives
12. Examining the Role of Women in Alleviating Poverty
13. Renewable Energy and Development in Africa. Reflections on the role of the African Union
14. African Union’s Position on Organic Agriculture: What Are the Benefits of Governance at Continental Level?
15. Africa and the MDG on Improved Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation: Case of Nigeria and Ghana

Part IV: Africa in the World Economy/Africa in the World Trading System
16. Are Mineral Resources in Africa Enriching Africans? : Trading with the World
17. Natural Resources for African Development under Sino-American Geostrategic Rivalry
18. Financing EU’s Economic Partnership Agreements in Africa: Implications of alternative funding initiatives
19. A ‘Wannabe Attitude’ – Africa’s New Hurdle to its’ Transformation and Achieving the MDGs
20. Pan-African Unity a Pre-Requisite for Pro-Active Response to Climate Change
21. Humanity and the Environment in Afrika: Environmentalism before the Environmentalists

Part V: Afropolitianism and Afro-centricity, and the African Diaspora
22. Decolonial Epistemic Perspective and Pan-African Unity in the 21st Century
23. Fanonian Thought and Implications for pan-African Unity
24. 21st Century Pan Africanism: Legitimizing the African Diaspora 6th Region
25. Reframing Trans-Atlantic Slavery as Humanicide: Resolving Hidden Wounds and Prioritizing a New Vision of African Humanity
26. Breaking the Cycle of Colonialism and Dependency in Africa: The Role of the African Diaspora
27. Making a Case for the Utilisation of African Diaspora in Promoting Economic Development of the Continent
28. Beyond Self-actualisation: Issues and Challenges Experienced by Young Africans Seeking Asylum in London and Building Resiliency for a way forward

CONCLUSION

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The Future We Chose: Emerging Perspectives on the Centenary of the ANC

Editor:          Busani Ngcaweni

ISBN:            978-0-7983-0436-8

Size:             240 x 165mm

Extent:         326 Pages

Published:     AISA

This book foregrounds emerging and different perspectives on the centenary of the ANC which was celebrated in February 2012. Differing in tenor, methodology and style, we present nineteen chapters that tackle various epochs and events in the making of the centenary of the oldest political organisation in Africa. The book offers new angles to our understanding of what sustained the ANC over one hundred years in spite of all the internal and external contradictions.

There is arguably a view that part of what distinguishes the ANC from other revolutionary movements in the continent is that from the turn of the twentieth century its founders prioritised national unity across tribal, ethnic, linguistic, religious, gender and racial identities. This ideal of national unity informed their responses to the formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910 and the declaration of the South African Republic in 1961. In principle, the leadership was opposed not to these manifestations of concrete nation state formation but to the practice of excluding the majority of South African citizens according to racial markers.

As a contribution to the historiography of the ANC and that of South Africa which it was established to liberate, the book tackles the following critical questions: what traits in the ANC’s genetic code have kept it alive for one hundred years? Is the ANC on course to meeting its historical mission of building an equitable, nonracial, non-sexist and socially-democratic society as articulated in the Africans’ Claims, the Freedom Charter and the Strategy and Tactics documents? Finally, would the ANC continue to retain relevance for a bicentenary especially as it now contends with new internal and external contradictions in an increasingly unequally society and unipolar world order? This new hypothetical architecture, hopefully, will be employed by many others engaged in the study of the rise and fall of political organisations.

Table of Contents:

Foreword

Preface

Acknowledgements

About the contributors

Acronyms

Part 1 The Future We Chose

Chapter 1. Locating the ANC centenary in the South African historiography: A prelude

Busani Ngcaweni

Chapter 2. Recalling the historical significance of Pixley ka Isaka Seme in the founding of the               ANC

Ntongela Masilela

Chapter 3. The African agenda and the origins of internationalism within the ANC: 1912-1960

Sifiso Mxolisi Ndlovu

Part 2 Pillars of the Struggle

Chapter 4. The evolution of internal mass mobilisation as an instrument against colonialism: from pre-1912 to 1994

Mathethe Jeffrey Sehume and Dan Motaung

Chapter 5. The doors of education and culture shall be open: The centrality of education in the history of the ANC

John Pampallis

Chapter 6. Revisiting the role of the student movement in the making of democratic South Africa

David Maimela

Chapter 7. Through the shadow of death: The ANC’s underground struggle

Siphamandla Zondi

Chapter 8. The fourth pillar: A century of solidarity in ANC politics

Essop Pahad, Chris Landsberg and Eddy Maloka

Chapter 9. The Scandinavian anti-apartheid movement: international solidarity in action

Bengt Säve-Söderbergh and Pekka Peltola

Chapter 10. The presence of African liberation movements in Egypt after the Bandung Conference in 1955

Helmi Sharawy

Part 3 The Battle of Ideas

Chapter 11. After the centenary: Reflecting on the growth and development of the ANC from a revolutionary populist movement to a governing party

Anver Saloojee

Chapter 12. The idea of the African National Congress, democratic paradox and the stubborn spectre of coloniality

Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni

Chapter 13. The centenary of the ANC: Prospects for the realisation of the pan-Africanist project

Thabo Mbeki

Chapter 14. Class dynamics and state transformation in South Africa

Joel Khathu Netshitenzhe

Part 4 The Future We Choose

Chapter 15. Organisational renewal: Aspiration or necessity?

Kgalema Motlanthe

Chapter 16. State, democracy and statistics in the making of the new South Africa

Pali Lehohla

Chapter 17. Socio-economic transformation in post-apartheid South Africa: Progress and challenges

Vusi Gumede

Chapter 18. Aspirations to an elusive developmental state: The obstacles to deep reform

Alan Hirsch

Chapter 19. The next frontier: Building a capable public service

Busani Ngcaweni

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The Social Contract in Africa

Editors: Sanya Osha

ISBN: 978-0-7983-0444-3

Size: 240mm x 170mm

Extent: 192 Pages

Availability: January 2014

Published: AISA

This book employs the event of the Arab Spring revolution of 2011 to reflect on the event itself and beyond. Some of the chapters address the colonial encounter and its lingering reverberations on the African sociopolitical landscape. Others address the aftermath of large scale societal violence and trauma that pervade the African context. The contributions indicate the range of challenges confronting African societies in the postmodern era. They also illustrate the sheer resilience and inventiveness of those societies in the face of apparently overwhelming odds.

What is the nature of political power in contemporary Africa as constituted from below instead of being a state-driven phenomenon? What constitutes sovereignty without recourse to the usual academic responses and discourses? These two questions loom behind most of the deliberations contained in this book with contributions from an impressive field of international scholars.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction

Chapter 1

Transnationalisation, denationalisation and deterritorialisation: Contemporary cultures in the context of globalisation

Chapter 2

African relational democracy: Reframing diversity, economic development and society-centered governance for the twenty-first century

Chapter 3

European ‘Democracy Promotion’: Dynamic versus passive revolution in the Arab Spring

Chapter 4

Arab Spring: Implications for South Africa and Swaziland

Chapter 5

No longer with the bourgeoisie: Fanonian considerations on social movements and forms of organisation

Chapter 6

What is beyond discourses of alterity? Reflections on the constitution of the present and construction of African subjectivity
Sabelo J Ndlovu-Gatsheni

Chapter 7

Literature as political critique in Nigeria: Mobilisation, dialogue and indictment

Chapter 8

Violent ethno-communual conflicts as a legacy of indirect rule in Africa: Understanding the Jesse Urhobo-Benin-Edo land conflicts of 1998

Chapter 9

Tragedy, Loss, Finality

Conclusion

 

To Order Contact

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